Locking Down Facebook…

Locking Down Facebook…

The following four articles led to this note. Please read them in order (but watch out for the AUTO LAUNCH VIDEO in the first link):

1. CBS News: Facebook knew of illicit user profile harvesting for 2 years, never acted

2. Reuters: Republican lawmakers concerned by Facebook data leak

3. The Guardian: How to protect your Facebook privacy – or delete yourself completely: If you found the Cambridge Analytica data breach revelations deeply unsettling, read our guide to the maze of your privacy settings

4. BBC News: Is leaving Facebook the only way to protect your data?

Upshot: Panic in the streets. Momentary threats to leave Facebook. And in a week, when something new distracts us, another privacy violation or some other horrible thing that happens in government or in your local community pushes the panic out of the way and we resume our daily lives. Continue reading “Locking Down Facebook…”

Annoyed by FB Game/App Invites? Block them!

Annoyed by FB Game/App Invites? Block them!

So, yo. Handy FB tip for reducing irritation (yours and mine). Got folks who use Apps? See invites from said folks? Still like them but don’t like the invites? Do something about it, because those apps are designed to share themselves around, kind of like herpes, and the sharing isn’t necessarily something they can control.

In the top blue bar, look for the padlock and three bars (to the right of the globe). Click that icon, then click the link at the bottom that says [See More Settings].

On the left you’ll see a link called [Blocking] (red circle, white bar). Click that link and then scroll down to the third section (App Invites). Type in the name of the offender(s).

Et voila, no more app invites from said person(s).

I’m up to an even dozen. I can still see their other posts, when they bother to do something other than play games.

And note: I don’t play games because they’re generally designed to pry into your friends list and do precisely this: Grab your data and keep it for their nefarious use. Not just time wasters, these “social” apps are privacy busters.

Just say no.

Comments:

Me: GG – here’s the good one to share. 8)

DK: If you have a friend who’s always finding new apps to use, you can block app invites from that person. On that same “Blocking” page, look for “Block app invites”. Place your friend’s name in the “Block invites from” box. Now you’ll see all their status updates, and any Event invitations, but not when the use a new game.

EJ: While intended for something else, I found Adblock Plus to be a wonderful way to reduce faicebukk irritation:
https://adblockplus.org/

LS: Yep. Adblock Plus is the way to go. And it works on way more than just FB.

EJ: I guess I should mention that I installed ABP not so much because of the amount of junk posts, but because FB did this nasty thing of “pegging” my CPU usage near 100%. It was constantly “doing stuff” that kept my CPU busy, which slowed down “other stuff”, and made my CPU run hotter than normal. This was/is a “known problem” with FB, but FB doesn’t seem to have any interest in dealing with the problem, or perhaps, admitting that it’s a problem in the first place.

LS: It has no incentive to fix anything that doesn’t drive away users. And let’s face it, the average FB user is willing to put up with a sharp stick in the eye every few weeks when the interface changes to make it more useful and friendly to advertisers.

DK: Social Fixer is another great add-on for FB. It will stop FB from continuing in infinite loops.

Me: AbP will also not fix the problem I’m addressing specifically with this note. App invites aren’t ads. They’re specific actions connected to and generated by the apps themselves.

While it’s good stuff, along with Social Fixer, it might be more appropriate for a separate post. Thanks!

Annoying Facebook Ads? Keep yourself off your friends’ pages!

Annoying Facebook Ads? Keep yourself off your friends’ pages!

Hey! So all those Facebook ads that are suddenly popping into your feed because someone “liked” something from a commercial site? You don’t like being linked that way? Don’t want to annoy your friends the same way?

Fix it!

If you look at the top of your Facebook page, on the right in the blue bar, you’ll see your icon and name, “Home” and a downward triangle.

Click the triangle once to open up your settings. Look at the bottom of the left column and you’ll see a text link for “privacy settings.” Click that link and it will open up a page with lots of useful settings here.

Find “Ads, Apps and Websites” to keep sponsored ads from showing up with your name on other FB user pages. Click Edit Settings again.

You can adjust all sorts of things here, especially if you use Apps frequently, but the sponsored ad stuff is below. See Ads, and click Edit Settings again.

Now you have two major ad types and you have to set each one individually. “Ads shown by third parties” and “Ads and friends” each have their own settings. Click through each section’s Edit Settings. (Or, try using these links, which might work for your login (or not):

https://www.facebook.com/settings?tab=ads

https://www.facebook.com/settings?tab=ads&section=platform

https://www.facebook.com/settings?tab=ads&section=social

The default is set to “Only My Friends” but you can change it to show “No One” your information. You have to choose the option in both places and save your settings.

FB advertised this change months and months ago, but finally got around to implementing the sponsor code about a month or so ago and it’s rolling out slowly. I just started seeing the ads on my page.

If you want me to tell you I’m seeing your name associated with restaurants and such, let me know. Happy to oblige.

Comments:

Me: Now in convenient shareable format.

LS: I don’t think this actually works. I’ve had both of those settings set to “No One” for a long time, and I still see both types of ads regularly in my feed. Until this changes, I consider it nothing but a digital pacifier.

Me: No. Your settings affect what you display on other people’s pages. FB defaults to displaying your likes for your friends unless you take the time to say otherwise. Your friends need to do the same. As you can see from the directions, these settings are very well hidden. The average user has no idea how to change these settings – something FB counts on for selling the ads in the first place.

Like I said, feel free to share.

LS: Ah, I misread. And yes, they are very well hidden, a true marvel of deliberately obfuscated GUI design. I must grudgingly admire the evil genius behind it.

Me: Remarkable how sneaky this is, huh?

LS: Almost as hard to find as the place where you can block specific apps.

“But look, you found the notice didn’t you?”

“Yes,” said Arthur, “yes I did. It was on display in the bottom of a locked filing cabinet stuck in a disused lavatory with a sign on the door saying ‘Beware of the Leopard’.”

Me: HHGTTG reference FTW!

JZS: Thanks for typing this up. I had already set my preferences thusly but it pays to check that they haven’t somehow changed mysteriously.

Theme: Elation by Kaira.