Say it with me… “Duh…”

Say it with me… “Duh…”

Too disgusted by most of the news today, I leave you instead with link sausage. I’ll get back to writing again sometime this weekend, before I lose any more details on CC26. I already managed to forget which day I bought the shawl…

Take the Tums first. Trust me…

Mr. President, the war isn’t about you — or golf


(the above gacked from D – the other two surfaced all on their own today and yesterday)

Passport cards called security vulnerability


and

Bin Laden: Palestinian cause fuels terror war

Note that I have no particular love for the state of Israel and I’m not presently looking for a debate on the relative merits of the “homeland” today. If people would just let go of the “holy war” and remember that everything is holy, whether we like it or not, we’d have a lot less of everything requiring Tums.

On a separate note, is it too early to start putting out Obama/Edwards posters?

Comments:

MS:
I heard on WTOP that Edwards does not want the VP position – but would consider another on staff.
Sigh.

Insanely busy the last couple of days…

Insanely busy the last couple of days…

Ok, so before I get started on the last couple of days, this I gotta share (thanks to RN, who finally forced me to get my own YouTube account).

Obviously not safe for work; not at all safe for kids either.

Freedom [better quality]

If you’re wondering why I’m not crowing more about the takeover of the House and Senate, the supremacy of the Democratic Party, or the end of the Evil Empire, understand that I’m just exhausted.

There’s a fine rant about the disgusting timeliness of The Crucible somewhere around here, and I might get there sometime soon, but not in the next couple of days. Besides, I think I need to think some more about what I want to say.

You may be surprised to discover that I’m really hoping people don’t screw this up. In the back of my head I’m hearing “be careful what you ask for” and it’s getting louder all the time.

Well, it’s about FREAKING time!

Well, it’s about FREAKING time!

White House: Detainees entitled to Geneva Convention protections

Lawmakers to draft legislation in response to high court decision

Tuesday, July 11, 2006; Posted: 1:24 p.m. EDT (17:24 GMT)

WASHINGTON(AP) — The Bush administration, called to account by Congress after the Supreme Court blocked military tribunals, said Tuesday that all detainees held at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba and in all other U.S. military custody around the world are entitled to protections under the Geneva Conventions.

Read more…

(Now, if we can just get the high court to admit spying on Americans without warrants is equally illegal, we’ll be in business again.)

I am *SO* there…

I am *SO* there…

The Controversy of Iraq Invasion

The excuse: There isn’t anyone else available to do the job.

The reason: The draw down started by Bush Senior has gutted our regular military to the point where our national guard has to step in and do the job.

The reality: These men and women are part-time soldiers with full-time families and these families are suffering hardships way beyond what should be happening.

And now? They’re talking about drawing down again.

WHY?

Because they can’t find enough folks who want to risk their lives in our name, and keeping the bases open is costing them too much money.

The result: DH ships off twice, for four months in a seven-month period, leaving his bosses hanging, leaving us with a reduced income (yes, that’s right, he’s not making his current salary while on duty), and he gets a whopping extra $250 per month in combat pay. He’ll have 240 hours of military leave between now and the end of the period. He’ll be gone for 640 hours total. Big effing deal.

I love my DH but I cannot and will not support this activity, and I will make my voice heard this time.

I didn’t go and march with the Million Moms. Last time I was out on the Mall in protest was during one of the Roe v. Wade support rallies (has to be 10 years ago, now). It’s time. I’ll be there and so will my kids.

Where will you be September 24th? Wanna join me?

Thoughts on Iraq: What do we do now?

Thoughts on Iraq: What do we do now?

On September 11, 2001, I was moved to write a commentary on the mind-bogglingly horrific disaster that was the World Trade Center attack. Its ramifications were and are as dramatic as I imagined they would be, but in ways I only
suspected would be true at the time.

On this eve, I am marveling at the audacity of our federal government and its leadership. They have been confronted with the reality of war in the very terms I was afraid would be true back when President Bush vowed to catch those responsible.

Shortly after the attacks of 9/11, I wrote a letter to President Bush and Vice President Cheney, begging them to consider very carefully their actions in pursuing the responsible individuals. In the letter, I said the following:

The President of the United States said, “This conflict was begun on the timing and terms of others. It will end in a way and at an hour of our choosing.” I fear that he may be wrong.

If we move without first being absolutely sure of our targets, we will disrupt the alliances we seem to have forged against the perpetrators of this horrible act. It does us no good to anger the people who have united with us, simply to slake the thirst of those who want blood now. Striking out blindly at targets that are not accurate, and doing no harm to the ones who deserve it most, makes us look foolish and incompetent. This we cannot afford to do.

And while I say that I do not want to explain to my daughter why her father did not come home, I do not want the deeds of September 11th to go unpunished. I cannot in good conscience tell my husband that he
must stay here. If he is called, as I am certain he will be, I must support him in any way I can.

But I say now, I will only feel good about making that sacrifice if the result is certain, appropriate and final.

So, I ask the President, the Congress, and the world to be sure that their actions are the right ones. Be careful about what you are doing, because what you could unleash may be much worse than what has already been done, as incomprehensible as that might be right now.

And, when you have decided, move swiftly, so that we can be sure that we do not miss the targets, and so our loved ones can come home.

This evening’s news speaks volumes about why my prediction remains true. As each minute passes, we find more individuals involved in the scandalous treatment of Iraqi prisoners. A Philadelphia man has been beheaded for our crimes. And at this writing Osama Bin Laden, the root of the original evil, is STILL at large!

What, in heaven’s name, are we doing? How can I be asked to support an action that brings our reputation to this? And how can anyone in this country even remotely contemplate supporting an action that has such consequences?

I am proud to be an American. My family has lived here for over a hundred years by choice. They fought hard and paid a price to live here. I have chosen to raise a family here. But when I can’t find it in my heart to respect our leaders because of their failure to respect my beliefs in the sanctity of humankind, when they abuse others in the name of liberty and freedom, what am I to do?

It is the responsibility of the United States to bring its own people to justice for committing some of the very crimes for which their foes have been accused. And it is the responsibility of our elected and appointed leaders to make a swift and sincere apology for the actions of those individuals who are supposed to be in our service.

The revolting photographs and discussions that litter every news service, including National Public Radio, are just the tip of the iceberg. Imagine how we must appear to the very people we are supposedly helping by continuing our presence in the middle east. How can we, in good conscience, continue to claim that we are helping the Iraqis?

To be blunt: This situation stinks. We have to get out of Iraq and quick, before we do any more damage to our already tarnished reputation, but we must avoid making an already horrendous situation even worse.

Regardless, we must spend the time with our military front line representatives and ensure that they clearly understand the Geneva Convention, and the ramifications of their actions. And we must do it before anyone else is killed.

I challenge George W. Bush to detail just how he intends to extract our troops without causing further damage. And for that matter, I challenge John Kerry to do the same. Should he win the election this coming November, Senator Kerry will surely inherit the mess that the Republican administration has left behind. We need to know now how he intends to clean it up.

It is our responsibility as citizens of the United States of America to elect leaders who will act in our best interests. There is simply no good that can come from an extended action in Iraq that will not ultimately result in ill will and financial ruin.

Please consider very carefully before casting your vote during this coming election. And remember that I have a husband who could easily be one of the individuals recognized nightly on The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer.

September 11, 2001

September 11, 2001

On a day that started with excitement about my own little world, the world was witness to an unbelievable tragedy.

It started so simply for me: A phone call from a mother to tell a father about his daughter’s new teeth, and to have a morning chat with him about trivialities.

How it will end is anyone’s guess. There are so many variables, so many possibilities, so vast a sense of loss, anger and shock about the events of the 11th of September, that it is impossible to predict how the landscape of the world will look even a month from now.

On September 10th, this was not the case.

On September 11th, at 8am EDT, this was not the case.

Right up to the point where the first commercial airplane impacted the first World Trade Center building, this was not the case.

We Americans have been comfortable in our ability to simply flit from place to place. There have been vague feelings of concern for the increasingly deadly military actions of other countries, but at such an incomprehensible distance that they were simply not of personal concern to most of us. We have been able to focus on things that now seem trivial and small in comparison.

Seeing the World Trade Center district in the aftermath of this most amazingly evil of atrocities, it’s hard not to think of Beirut, of Bosnia, or even of London 50 years ago.

But not Manhattan.

Not New York.

Not here.

We are now faced with a task which I am not sure is possible to accomplish, at a cost I don’t know if we are prepared to pay.

Until now, the realities of the last World War belonged to the old folks. Those who preceded the “Baby Boomer” generation who are fading fast from age or disease. There are not many people left who can remember what this world was like during the last World War. Not so many who remember Korea, for that matter.

The newer wars, Vietnam and Desert Storm, were different. With all the odds against us, we could never have won in Vietnam. Desert Storm taught us that the next World War must be different. In the wake of the responses to this ongoing tragedy, by all accounts, this war could be different from anything we have ever seen, and could ever imagine, even in the most cynical eye of Science Fiction authors. And yet, it could resemble these actions in so many awful ways. It could even resemble the Crusades, if we are not careful.

There are those who do not understand why we have not already leveled Kabul. There are those who believe that to be a Muslim means that you are automatically a terrorist. There are those who feel that this act is justified because our country condones and backs the actions of the Israelis, and that to be Jewish means that you automatically support Israel’s actions against the Palestinians.

These people are all guilty of oversimplification.

To be sure, those responsible have it coming. I don’t dispute that one bit.

But we have bombed Iraq almost continually since Desert Storm began, and yet Saddam Hussein remains in power.

We bombed Afghanistan after the last action linked directly to Osama bin Laden, and yet he continues to be the source of great pain and suffering.

The President of the United States said, “This conflict was begun on the timing and terms of others. It will end in a way and at an hour of our choosing.” I fear that he may be wrong.

If we move without first being absolutely sure of our targets, we will disrupt the alliances we seem to have forged against the perpetrators of this horrible act. It does us no good to anger the people who have united with us, simply to slake the thirst of those who want blood now. Striking out blindly at targets that are not accurate, and doing no harm to the ones who deserve it most, makes us look foolish and incompetent. This we cannot afford to do.

And while I say that I do not want to explain to my daughter why her father did not come home, I do not want the deeds of September 11th to go unpunished. I cannot in good conscience tell my husband that he must stay here. If he is called, as I am certain he will be, I must support him in any way I can.

But I say now, I will only feel good about making that sacrifice if the result is certain, appropriate and final.

So, I ask the President, the Congress, and the world to be sure that their actions are the right ones. Be careful about what you are doing, because what you could unleash may be much worse than what has already been done, as incomprehensible as that might be right now.

And, when you have decided, move swiftly, so that we can be sure that we do not miss the targets, and so our loved ones can come home.

Theme: Elation by Kaira.